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THE BIGGEST USERS OF KAMAHAPA FONTS

Posted by Chris Muema on

This time, we thought to return to interlaced visuals. We get asked a lot of, "Is anyone interested in your fonts?" The simplistic anser is, YES . . .  Then follows the BUT . . . We folks want is Accessorized Fonts Not just plain fonts, but fonts that have bells and whistles (features). So we took the challenge and made a Font App.   Below: A glimps of the demography of our Fonts App as of November 10, 2015   Below, a screenshot of the KH3 app   Below, the versions of Android devices using the KH3 Fonts app...

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CONSPIRACY: "DID CERN REALLY 'FIND' the FIRST WEB PAGE?"

Posted by Chris Muema on

WHO REALLY CREATED THE FIRST WEB SITE? In early 2013, a conundrum engulfed syndicated media concerning CERN (http://home.web.cern.ch/). The problem was (and we think, still is), CERN could not trace the first-ever Web-Page.   Somehow, magically, after international appeal, CERN “found” what they now call “the first Web-Page” and that version of story-telling is published. Thus CERN republished the very-very-very-first web-page, supposedly originated in 1989 as shown here @ http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html. The fact that the hyperlinks work suggests it is also a website.   THE PROBLEM IS, Nobel Laureate, Tim Berners-Lee’s (Tim BL) apparently competing account of the first Web-Page: See...

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FONT DECORATING & THE LANGUAGE PROBLEM: PART 3 of 3

Posted by Chris Muema on

In Part 1, we compared the simplicity of Latin (European origin) characters to Asian and Middle-Eastern (Arabic) characters in so far as how much effort it would take to re-decorate them.  The visual examples showed, clearly, that Latin characters have fewer ink-strokes when translated to Asian or Arabic characters; glyph-to-glyph. However, we also looked at meaning in a single Latin alphabet letter versus meaning in an Asian and Arabic alphabet character.  In that framework, we illustrated that the meaning of most Latin characters is reduced to a sound or visual icon versus many Asian and Arabic characters that denote a...

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FONT DECORATING & THE LANGUAGE PROBLEM: PART 2 of 3

Posted by Chris Muema on

In Part 1, we looked at the effort it takes artists to decorate fonts in different languages.  We compared European (Latin) characters to Chinese, Hindi, Gujarati and Arabic characters.  We found, with examples, that at first-blush, single-character Latin fonts have fewer brushstrokes than Middle-Eastern or Asian characters.  However, we found that Latin characters generally carry no meaning if not assembled to form words, thus making more brush-strokes.  Of course, logically, we can deduce that more brush-strokes makes for increased effort by the artist to decorate fonts.   The problem is, there are very few such straight-forward conversions (glyph-for-glyph) of Latin...

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FONT DECORATING & THE LANGUAGE PROBLEM: PART 1 of 3

Posted by Chris Muema on

JUST IMAGINE . . . What would your writing experience be like if you could decorate or re-style Chinese writing, or Hindi writing or even Arabic writing?   What would Asian and Arabic writing look like if re-styled with the  (The KamaHapa eBLOCK_Regular1)? Or decorated with the (The KamaHapa eSNO-FLEK_INSERT1)? But more importantly, is radical re-stylizing of non-European (non-Latin) writing culturally acceptable among that readership?   Let’s begin with a little bit of an academic exercise about the effort it takes artists to create font-styles. Consider for example, the character glyph  (HINDI), which could be translated into a European-Originated character as...

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